Book: Displaced

"Displaced"

“SPACE.
When Elay’s
Nanay
decided
to pack her bags,
board the airplane,
and fly back
to Manila,

TIME.
Elay’s glorious hours of
guitar-playing,
exam-flunking,
Facebook-viewing,
iPod-listening,
Justin-daydreaming
slowly
decreased
to
zero.

FORCE.
The harder she struggled
to return to how things were,

DISPLACEMENT
the greater the forces
that took her farther.

Displaced is a little unconventional as coming-of-age novels go. For one thing, the story is told through poetry– A genius move, in my opinion, that’s also very frustrating.

Poetry is a genre that leaves a lot to reader interpretation. Each line cut, each extra space, has a meaning to the writer that may not mean the same for the reader. Which is why I think it’s genius that author Aneka Rodriguez uses this medium to tell her story of adolescence–that confusing point in time when every little thing can make or break relationships.

We all have our own set of experiences when it comes to growing up, to falling in love; we all have different relationships with our parents, with our guardians, and with the families we chose to surround ourselves with. And Displaced tries to capture our feelings as it tries to tell its story. Especially when you read it out loud. Every change in how you pause, in how you cut off every line– It tells a different story each time.

Which brings me to my frustration.

Displaced is the story of every one told through the story of one person. Although I feel that the format is genius, it doesn’t change the fact that the story itself isn’t special. It relies too much on how you read it to make it something more than what it is.

The thing is, I don’t know what else one can do to make this novel something more than just a novelty. The premise is sound, but not special. And I’m left with a dilemma where I don’t want to put down a good book–but I don’t know how to promote it because, aside from the poetry, there’s really nothing to make it stand out from other releases.

But here’s where you can help.

There’s a comment section below. If you’ve read this book, tell me (and the others who have stumbled upon this blog) why Displaced is a must-read. What other things, aside from its form, sets it apart? Let’s have a discussion.

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