Book: The Mark of Athena

"The Mark of Athena"

Annabeth is terrified. Just when she’s about to be reunited with Percy–after six month of being apart, thanks to Hera–it looks like Camp Jupiter is preparing for war. As Annabeth and her friends Jason, Piper, and Leo fly in on the Argo II, she can’t blame the Roman demigods for thinking the ship is a Greek weapon. With its steaming bronze dragon figurehead, Leo’s fantastical creation doesn’t appear friendly. Annabeth hopes that the sight of their praetor Jason on deck will reassure the Romans that the visitors from Camp Half-Blood are coming in peace.

And that’s only one of her worries. In her pocket, Annabeth carries a gift from her mother that came with an unnerving command: Follow the Mark of Athena. Avenge me. Annabeth already feels weighed down by the prophecy that will send seven demigods on a quest to find–and close–the Doors of Death. What more does Athena want from her?

Annabeth’s biggest fear, though, is that Percy might have changed. What if he’s now attached to Roman ways? Does he still need his old friends? As the daughter of the goddess of war and wisdom, Annabeth knows she was born to be a leader–but never again does she want to be without Seaweed Brain by her side.

Wow. I just have to say… Wow.

When I started reading the book, I wasn’t expecting anything. I mean, I knew I was bound to like it–just like I did the previous Percy Jackson books. I didn’t expect that I wouldn’t like it. That I would find it tedious. Boring. And completely out of tune with the rest of the series. From my point of view, anyway.

You know how in television shows you get filler episodes? A whole episode where something happens, the main story is pushed towards where it’s supposed to go–but nothing significant actually takes place? That’s how I felt about The Mark of Athena. Filler. And to top it all off, it didn’t feel like I was reading a Percy Jackson book. Because none of the characters were likeable.

I’m trying to understand why exactly that is. I mean, all the characters we interact with in this book are characters that have already appeared before. All of them were likeable before. So what happened?

Could it be that author Rick Riordan took on too many heroes at a time? After all, in all the Percy Jackson books, we’ve only had to deal with three main characters at a time–and suddenly, there’s seven of them. And while he tries to balance that all the heroes get a moment to shine, the experiment falls flat as certain personalities tend to come out in a bad light during the parts where he does this. In fact, the moments when the characters splinter off into smaller groups are more enjoyable to read than the ones where they all appear.

More than that though, the book just doesn’t feel special. I don’t know if Riordan is finally running out of mythologies to twist and modernize, or if he’s finally getting tired of the mythologies… but this book just didn’t have the magic of his previous books. And that’s what it comes down to in the young adult adventure genre, isn’t it? There has to be magic.

No, I don’t mean literal magic. But in a genre that’s currently teeming with so many titles, you want a book that can stand out–that can make spending PhP 699 (or $11.98) worth it. And I just didn’t feel that with The Mark of Athena.

Oh, and don’t get me started on the twist that’s supposed to make you cry–but you won’t. Because you know that it’s a set-up. It’s been spelled out the moment– well, I won’t spoil it for the ones who want to read the book. Just… don’t get your hopes up.

I’m hoping that the next book, The House of Hades, is way better than this. Then again, I’m sure other people liked the book. Why don’t we check out what said people wrote about The Mark of Athena?
Throuthehaze Reads
My Book Musings
Rachel’s Reads
The Girl Who Read and Other Stories
YouTube Review: CassJayTuck

8 thoughts on “Book: The Mark of Athena

    • It does have that feel, don’t it? Though, I kinda was okay with The Lost Hero and The Son of Neptune.

      But if you’re already stuck on The Lost Hero–The Mark of Athena might make you want to not pick up any more of the Heroes of Olympus titles.:/

    • Haha, I love that — “The Potter Barrier.”

      Thing is, I think TMoA is a fluke. Well, I’m hoping it’s one anyway. Seeing as it’s so far the only book that is different from the rest, being the only one that focused too much on internal problems.

      Riordan has to realize that readers love his Camp Half-Blood series because of the adventure. Sure, character development is nice–but a series of books that uses mythology as its base–and barely changes it to fit the modern times? We’re not expecting classics–we just want to be entertained.

  1. Pingback: Book: Flesh & Bone | taking a break

  2. Pingback: Book: The House of Hades | taking a break

  3. Pingback: Book: The Sword of Summer, Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard Book 1 | taking a break

  4. Pingback: Book: The Hidden Oracle (The Trials of Apollo, Book 1) | taking a break

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s