Movie: Kaleidoscope World

"Kaleidoscope World"

Lando, a poor boy, meets a rich girl, Elsa, in an open audition for the number one local hip hop crew that is competing for an international dance event. Lando and Elsa make it to the team but as their life and love unfold their dance crumbles.

Deep breaths. Deep, deep breaths.

I wanted to like this film. Really, I did. It stars two actors who I really believe has the acting chops to pull off lead roles, and they do showcase their acting capabilities in this film well. Unfortunately, that’s the only good thing I can say about this film: Sef Cadayona and Yassi Pressman acted their asses off.

But the whole film was just bad. Really bad. So bad that I wanted to walk out in the middle of the film. I didn’t. Because I had to stick through the whole thing to see if it gets better.

Spoiler alert: it doesn’t.

Let’s list down the things that was wrong in the film:

Number one is structure. We have two characters whose lives intertwine, but are given problems that don’t really have anything to do with each other. Until past the halfway mark, when the writer seemed to have realized that the audience will have no idea what would make them root for the our lead couple. So the lead female is forcibly made to bear the brunt of the male lead’s conflict.

I feel as if the writer of the screenplay fell into the trap of trying to keep the twists surprising. Which is not what you want to do with a love story. You want your audience to know what’s going to keep your couple apart. So they root for the couple. By keeping the conflict a secret, you’ve only made your viewers apathetic.

When nothing is standing in the way of your lovers, you don’t root for them to succeed. Having finished the film, I already know that there’s an obstacle. But by the time it is introduced, viewers would have already stopped caring… and the conflict is made to look like a last minute addition.

Which leads me to the second problem of the film: conflict. Sef Cadayona’s character has a very alienating conflict: he freezes up whenever he remembers what happened to his dad. And this is not revealed until near the end of the film. And this is never resolved.

Oh, wait, should I have warned that there will be spoilers? Well, there are spoilers here. You have been warned now.

Back to Sef Cadayona’s very internal conflict: we get flashes of it, bit by bit, throughout the film. And this will confuse the hell out of you. Especially near the end, when two characters involved with Yassi Pressman’s character are revealed to be integral to Sef Cadayona’s conflict–and yet they don’t recognize Sef’s character at all.

I am serious. It doesn’t make sense.

And let’s not even start on the conflict between Yassi’s aunt and uncle that keeps getting addressed, but gets dropped with nary a mention ever again after their one confrontation. Suddenly, everything is right with the two again.

That leads me to the third problem of the film: resolutions. There are none. I’m not looking for a happy ending. I’m not looking for a wrap-up with a nice bow. I just want to see that the stories introduced are actually going somewhere.

We have a story thread about a dance competition, a group story arc, that suddenly ends with a performance. There are problems introduced into this arc that gets resolved off screen–if they did get resolved at all.

We have a thread on Yassi Pressman’s criminal past, and the part dancing plays in it. This does not get resolved, because Yassi’s story is suddenly cut short.

There’s a thread on Sef Cadayona’s juggling act between taking classes, starting to nod off at his part-time work, practicing during all the free time he has left, and still finding time to go to different malls just so he could stalk Yassi’s character. Oh wait, that’s not so much a problem about resolution as it is a problem on logic, and maybe Sef’s ability to clone himself so he can be in different locations at the same time.

And then there’s the weird cousin of Yassi’s character and her desire to dance. That goes nowhere fast.

But the worst offender of this is the main love thread. Yassi takes off from her aunt’s house, goes to Sef’s neighborhood, gets stabbed–apparently, to death, and yet appears to hug her group mates in the dance competition abroad.

What now?

I wanted to support Kaleidoscope World because it’s different from the usual fare. Also, I want to support Yassi and Sef’s career. But I can not, on good conscience, recommend this film to anyone.

Because the biggest problem I have with this film is that it masqueraded as a dance film. The characters dance, yes. But this is not a dance film. Street Dance is a dance film. Save the Last Dance, Center Stage, heck even I Do Bidoo Bidoo is a dance film. The Step Up franchise, even when the story is at its flimsiest, are dance films. Kaleidoscope World is a an acting reel masquearading as a film, much less a dance film.

Dance films feature dance prominently. Dance films have good music. Dance films do not use stock, royalty-free music during montages. Dance films will not just pile together different dances just to show the characters dancing. Dance is the most important part of a dance film. You do not give it the short end of the deal.

A dance film can get away with a threadbare story if the dance is good. And the biggest crime Kaleidoscope World commits is casting good dancers and never featuring them properly.

Kaleidoscope World isn’t just a waste of time and money. It also wastes the talent of the actors and dancers involved. And I’m not surprised that the director seem to have had his name stricken out of the credits.

About these ads

2 thoughts on “Movie: Kaleidoscope World

  1. The film just revealed a final cut in the cinemas with a full ending and resolutions to both Lando and Elsa’s stories :)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s